Participant Experiences

Bruce Fisher

Bruce Fisher

Assistant Professor, Construction Management

“As a result of my participation in this project and my interactions with peers, the biggest impact on my teaching has been for me to refocus my thoughts concerning course development. Instead of developing presentation materials first and then creating assessments to see if the students mastered the issues, I now look towards the end of the course and focus on what it is that I want students to learn and then structure the presentations to achieve these goals. As such, instead of blindly hoping to achieve my course goals, I now aim directly at them.”

Christine Marvin, Ph.D.

Christine Marvin, Ph.D.

Associate Professor, Special Education and Communication Disorders

“Through my participation, I was amazed and embarrassed to discover that I had course objectives I never taught, I had course objectives I taught but never assessed, I had course objectives I assessed and never taught, and I had material I taught and assessed but never listed as a course objective. By reorganizing the goals of my course, developing rubrics for evaluating student work, and assessing my classroom activities, I now have a focused approach for linking my teaching to my students’ learning.”

Dana Fritz, MFA

Dana Fritz, MFA

Associate Professor, Art and Art History

“Producing an Inquiry Portfolio gave me a framework in which to refine my course. Although the methods I used seemed at first too scientific for a subjective area like art, the "Hypothesis, Data, Conclusion" structure allowed me to be more objective about my teaching. Participating in the project has helped me to write better curricula and more fairly evaluate student learning. The reflective writing process used in the project was so useful that it inspired me to assign my students to reflect in writing on their drawing process and progress. Among other things, this written component helps me to better understand their perceptions of the course and helps students to see their progress more clearly.”

Frauke Hachtmann, Ph.D.

Frauke Hachtmann, Ph.D.

Assistant Professor, Advertising

“The feedback that I provide on student work is much more detailed and user-friendly. Students have indicated that they have a better idea of how their grade was calculated/assigned.”

Kevin Lee

Kevin Lee

Professor, Physics and Astronomy

“My experience encouraged me to finally get rid of having lectures in my classroom. I don’t think I will ever lecture in my course again. I spend my preparation time making worksheets and peer instruction materials rather lectures. I made the leap to a 100% student-centered pedagogy because of my peer review experiences. It made me completely aware of how little my students were learning.”

Larkin Powell, Ph.D.

Larkin Powell, Ph.D.

Assistant Professor, School of Natural Resources

“By participating in the project, I have added lectures, discussions, and activities that are directly tied to course objectives, and I better monitor student groups. In addition, I have created grading rubrics that force me to clarify my expectations – this has allowed my students to understand what is expected of them.”

Leen-Kiat Soh, Ph.D.

Leen-Kiat Soh, Ph.D.

Assistant Professor, Computer Science and Engineering

“From my participation, I am more aware of things now. My delivery is less "arbitrary" and less "regimental". I have always been able to incorporate games and fun stuff into my courses; but the "delivery" of regular lectures might be a bit too dull at times, or lack of motivating factors ... these days, I think I am better at communicating and motivating the students about what I expect and what they should expect out of the courses.”

Mary Gabriel

Mary Gabriel

Lecturer, Family and Consumer Science

“As a result of my participation, I revised the assignments to include more reflective journaling and discussion. I framed the guiding questions to investigate the challenges, successes, and needs that were emerging as the students interacted with the children in the lab. As a result, the students reflected on their own skill development as well as the skill development of the children they were teaching in the lab. Students then began asking more questions and we went on from there reflecting on our roles as teachers and researchers. The journaling provided a written documentation of the process.”

Marilynn Schnepf, Ph.D.

Marilynn Schnepf, Ph.D.

Professor, Nutrition and Health Sciences

“I am now more concerned with the question "How do I know if students are learning what I want them to learn?" I use more minute papers in class to gauge student learning through their comments. I have tried to tie objectives more closely to activities. I am not sure if student leaning has been impacted yet. I feel that the course is more coherent and learning activities are more closely tied together.”

Stuart Bernstein

Stuart Bernstein

Assistant Professor, Construction Systems Technology

“My participation in the project has given me a fundamental understanding of how to determine my course goals and outcomes before developing the actual syllabus. I have been able to develop an excellent design for the course I was working on and, more importantly, I have been inspired to work with my department colleagues to create goals and outcomes for all our courses.”